For Further Reading

Historical data in this text relies upon publications, documents, and loose records housed in the Orange County Sheriff’s Department Archives, California. All of the resources cited below were actually consulted in the preparation of this text. The defining history of the Orange County Sheriff’s Department has yet to be written. The most complete histories thus far are in Orange County Sheriff Coroner: A Legacy of Public Service, Dedication, and Sacrifice, 1889-2004, Santa Ana, Calif., the Orange County Sheriff’s Department, 2004; the Orange County Sheriff’s Museum & Educational Center website, http://www.ocsheriffmuseum.com; and Pamela Hallan-Gibson, A Century of Service: An Illustrated History of the Orange County Sheriff’s Department, Santa Ana, Calif., The Orange County Sheriff’s Department Welfare Committee, 1988. An additional departmental yearbook addresses the history of the OCSD: A History of the Orange County Sheriff-Coroner’s Department, Santa Ana, Calif., the Orange County Sheriff’s Department, 1976. J.M. Hollenbeck, The Golden Star, An Illustrated History of the Badges, Patches, and Insignia of the Orange County Sheriff’s Department, Santa Ana, Calif., the Orange County Sheriff’s Museum & Educational Center, 2007, contains much valuable information, as well. The very early history of crime and law enforcement in what became Orange County can be found in Maj. Horace Bell, Reminiscences of a Ranger, or Early Times in Southern California, Santa Barbara, Calif., Wallace Hebberd, 1927; Maj. Horace Bell, Lanier Bartlett, ed., On the Old West Coast, Being Further Reminiscences of a Ranger, New York, Grosset & Dunlap, 1930; Benjamin Ignatius Hayes, Marjorie Tisdale Wolcott, ed., Pioneer Notes from the Diaries of Judge Benjamin Hayes, 1849-1875, Los Angeles, Calif., Marjorie Tisdale Wolcott, 1929; and J. D. Borthwick, Three Years in California, (1857; reprint 2011 by Linda Pendleton.) Four general histories of Orange County, addressing the later development of law enforcement in the county, are: Pamela Hallan-Gibson, The Golden Promise: An Illustrated History of Orange County, Northridge, Calif., Windsor Publications Inc., 1986; Pamela Hallan-Gibson, The Bench and the Bar: A Centennial View of Orange County’s Legal History, Chatsworth, Calif., and Orange County, Calif., Windsor Publications Inc. with the Orange County Bar Association, 1989; Charles D. Swanner, 50 Years a Barrister in Orange County, Claremont, Calif., Fraser Press, 1965; and James D. Sleeper, Turn the Rascals Out!: The Life and Times of Orange County’s Fighting Editor Dan M. Baker, Trabuco Canyon, Calif., California Classics, 1973. Fully documented primary-source research remains to be conducted into the “Tomato Springs Shootout,” as many rewrites of rewrites exist thus far. Perhaps the most thorough account is James D. Sleeper, “Posse Slays Desperado,” in the Rancho San Joaquin Gazette, a corporate publication, undated but about 1968. Scholar Sleeper consulted some sources who had first-hand knowledge of the shootout, but the article lists no sources. Two publications address the Christmas 1970 hippie takeover of Laguna Beach: Bob Emmers, “Laguna on Acid: The Great Hippie Christmas Invasion of 1970” in OC Weekly of December 24, 1998; and especially Nicholas Schou, Orange Sunshine: The Brotherhood of Eternal Love and Its Quest to Spread Peace, Love, and Acid to the World, New York, St. Martin’s Press, 2010. The only full account of actress Bebe Daniels’ remarkable run-in with Orange County’s speed laws is in Jill Allgood, Bebe and Ben, London, Robert Hale & Co., 1975. The Orange County Sheriff’s Museum & Educational Center conducted a lengthy recorded interview with former Sheriff Brad Gates in August 2012, during which the sheriff discussed his lengthy and distinguished career; digital copy and transcript now stored in the Orange County Sheriff’s Archives.